Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Can Safely Receive Bisphosphonates With Less Frequency

Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Can Safely Receive Bisphosphonates With Less Frequency
bisphosphonatesResearchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that women suffering from metastatic breast cancer of the bone can receive bisphosphonates less often after the first year of administration, this way reducing the risk of serious side effects. Distant metastases are the cause of about 90% of deaths due to breast cancer, and metastatic breast cancer patients are likely to develop bone metastasis throughout their disease, since bone is one of the primary metastatic sites in this type of cancer. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs that prevent the loss of bone mass and are commonly used to treat bone metastasis in different types of cancer. For example, Zoledronate is a high-potency intravenous bisphosphonate that has been shown modify progression of skeletal metastasis in patients suffering from breast cancer. MD Anderson’s Gabriel Hortobagyi, MD, professor, Breast Medical Oncology, presented clinical data from the
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