Study Finds Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Only Adds Marginal Life Expectancy Benefit For Breast Cancer Patients

Study Finds Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Only Adds Marginal Life Expectancy Benefit For Breast Cancer Patients
shutterstock_126247208Recent research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, titled Survival Outcomes After Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy: A Decision Analysis, has demonstrated that, even though the incidences of contralateral prophylactic mastectomies (CPM) in women suffering from breast cancer in only one breast has increased in the U.S., it only adds a marginal life expectancy benefit, depending on the type and stage of cancer. CPM consists of a double mastectomy in which the healthy breast is removed alongside the cancerous one, to reduce the risk of recurrence. As such, breast cancer patients report that the main reason they choose CPM is out of concern they will develop contralateral breast cancer. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry, lead author Pamela R. Portschy, of the Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and colleagues, designed a model simulating survival outcomes for women with stage I or II breast cancer receiving or not CPM. Survival benefit estimates were created for women according to age, breast cancer stag
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