Eribulin, A Drug Originally Developed In Sea Sponges Can Increase Survival In Women With Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Eribulin, A Drug Originally Developed In Sea Sponges Can Increase Survival In Women With Triple Negative Breast Cancer
shutterstock_155351291According to research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool, eribulin, a cancer drug originally developed from sea sponges, could add an average of five months of life to women suffering with advanced triple negative breast cancer. Professor Chris Twelves and his team from the University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, assessed two major clinical trials of more than 1,800 women suffering with breast cancer that began to spread to other regions of their bodies. The Phase 3 trials (preceding the decision of whether a drug should be prescribed to patients or not) compared the survival rates of women treated with eribulin to those treated with a standard therapy. Both studies showed an overall improvement in survival for women treated with eribulin. The most significant results were seen in women with advanced triple negative breast cancer, a form of cancer that has limited treatment options. Upon eribulin treatment, these women survived and additional five months. Furthermore, women suffering from HER2 negative
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