Study Evaluates Use of HIFs Inhibitors For The Treatment Of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Study Evaluates Use of HIFs Inhibitors For The Treatment Of Triple Negative Breast Cancer
shutterstock_109294079A new study entitled “Hypoxia-inducible factors are required for chemotherapy resistance of breast cancer stem cells” highlights the potential of administrating hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) inhibitors with chemotherapy to improve triple negative breast cancer patient survival. The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs), which account for approximately 20% of all breast cancers (in African-American women are responsible for 30%), are characterized by the lack of three major receptors – estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2+) – that render tumor cells susceptible to standard chemotherapy. Thus, while ER/PR+ cancers and HER2+ cancers are treated with receptor targeted-chemotherapy, the treatment applied to TNBCs is restricted to cytotoxic chemotherapy with an effective response in the long run inferior to 20%. Notably, TNBCs are enriched in a subpopulation of cells – breast cancer stem cells – that are responsible for tumor resistance to chemotherapy and are major contributors to tumor metastasis. Additionally, TNBCs are characterized by induct
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