UT Southwestern Researchers Use Whole-Genome Sequencing To Identify Breast Cancer Mutations

UT Southwestern Researchers Use Whole-Genome Sequencing To Identify Breast Cancer Mutations
shutterstock_129857873A group of researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center has shown that whole-genome sequencing can be successfully used to assess a patient’s risk to develop hereditary cancer. "Whole-genome sequencing is a new genetic tool that can determine more of a person's DNA sequence than ever before. Our results show that nearly 90 percent of clinically identified mutations were confidently detected and additional cancer gene mutations were discovered, which together with the decreasing costs associated with whole-genome sequencing means that this method will improve patient care, as well as lead to discovery of new cancer genes," lead author Dr. Theodora Ross, Professor of Internal Medicine and Director of UT Southwestern's Cancer Genetics Program, said in a news release. Patients who are known to have a genetic predisposition for certain types of cancer are counseled by Dr. Ross and her team to understand the most appropriate ways of early cancer detection and/or prevention. A significant percentage of all cancers are caused by inherited genetic mutations (5-10%). In breast cancer, mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for the majority of hereditary forms of this malignancy. Furthermore, mutations in the
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