Researchers Find Gene Responsible for Aggressive Forms of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Researchers Find Gene Responsible for Aggressive Forms of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
shutterstock_212743078A large multidisciplinary team led by researchers at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and the University of New South Wales in Australia recently published in the journal Nature Communications that the so-called “triple-negative breast cancers” are in fact two distinct disorders that probably originate from different cell types. The study is entitled “ID4 controls mammary stem cells and marks breast cancers with a stem cell-like phenotype.” Around 15% of all diagnosed breast cancers are considered triple-negative breast cancers, characterized by the lack of the receptors commonly targeted in chemotherapy — estrogen, progesterone or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These cancers are frequently non-responsive to targeted therapeutic drugs and patients usually have a higher risk of disease recurrence and a shorter survival rate than patients with other types of breast cancer. Curiously, patients with triple-negative breast cancer can be classified into two categories: those that succumb to the disease within 3 to 5 years despite treatment, and those that remain disease-free for a longer period in comparison t
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