Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Improves Detection of Precancerous Breast Changes In Women With BRCA Mutations

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Improves Detection of Precancerous Breast Changes In Women With BRCA Mutations
shutterstock_72141592Results from a recent study published in the journal Radiology showed that the clinical management of women at risk of breast cancer could improve the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), that can monitor biochemical changes in the breast tissue. Women that have mutations in the BRAC gene are at a higher risk of developing breast cancer. Specifically, there is a 50% risk of breast cancer before the age of 50 in women who have BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations, with tumors developing within months of a negative mammography screening. As such, many women who carry BRCA mutations undergo mastectomies to prevent future cancer. In the study, researchers identified biochemical modifications related to early stage of cancer development using 2-D localized correlated spectroscopy (L-COSY). A total of 9 women with BRCA1 mutations and 14 women with BRCA2 mutations were assessed with L-COSY and compared to 10 healthy women without a breast cancer family history. All women were examined with contrast enhanced 3-T MRI and ultrasound. The results revealed no abnormalities in the MRI and ultrasound, however L-COSY MRS detected biochemical changes in women carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations when compared to healthy controls. The results revealed many distinct cellular modifications assessed through L-COS
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