Specific Molecular Signature Linked to Aggressive Triple-Negative Breast Cancers

Specific Molecular Signature Linked to Aggressive Triple-Negative Breast Cancers
Researchers at the Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah and The Fourth Military Medical University, China, discovered the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth and survival of a specific type of aggressive breast cancer — triple-negative breast cancer. The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and is entitled “Metabolic reprogramming in triple-negative breast cancer through Myc suppression of TXNIP.” It is estimated that 15% of all diagnosed breast cancers correspond to triple-negative breast cancers, a type that lacks the receptors commonly targeted in chemotherapy — estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Compared to other breast cancer types, triple-negative breast cancers are usually more aggressive, non-responsive to targeted therapeutic drugs and patients frequently have a higher risk of recurrence and a shorter survival rate. Triple-negative breast cancers are known to be highly glycolytic, meaning that they consume high amounts of the sugar glucose. “Normal cells do use glucose and glutamine,” explained the study’s senior author Dr. Donald Ayer in a
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.