Alcohol Triggers Gene That May Increase Risk of Breast Cancer, According to Researchers

Alcohol Triggers Gene That May Increase Risk of Breast Cancer, According to Researchers
In a study appearing in the journal PloS ONE, a team of researchers from the University of Houston found a link between breast cancer and alcohol by identifying a cancer-causing gene that is triggered by alcohol. The article is tilted "Alcohol Regulates Genes that Are Associated with Response to Endocrine Therapy and Attenuates the Actions of Tamoxifen in Breast Cancer Cells.” This year, more than 230,000 women in the United States will develop breast cancer, one of the most common causes of cancer deaths in American women. Several environmental factors are known to increase the risk of breast cancer, including behaviors people can modify such as alcohol consumption. Epidemiological studies have strongly linked alcohol consumption to an increased risk of breast cancer. These studies also show that breast cancer risk is positively correlated with the amount of alcohol consumed. Alcohol consumption has been found to be associated with the development of hormone-dependent breast cancers as well as disease progression and recurrence following endocrine treatment. "Alcohol consumption is prevalent among women in the U.S. and is a risk factor for breast cancer," UH cancer biologist Chin-Yo Lin, an assistant professor with the UH Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling and the Department of Biology and Biochemistry, said in a
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