Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Drugs are Focus of Partnership Between SRI Biosciences, Stanford Cancer Institute

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Drugs are Focus of Partnership Between SRI Biosciences, Stanford Cancer Institute
SRI International and Stanford Cancer Institute will collaborate on an innovative new venture to develop investigational drugs to treat triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). This new research collaboration will look into the potential of a preclinical drug known as sudemycin D6 that targets the spliceosome – a kind of a "molecular machine" pivotal to the basic biological transformation of DNA into RNA and proteins. In a way, the spliceosome edits raw RNA transcribed from DNA by separating and reassembling stretches of code to form the instructions necessary to create several functional proteins – like a film director would craft a finished movie from the unedited footage. If this biological complex edition process is defective, the proteins that will ultimately result from its action will be dysfunctional, potentially leading to multiple forms of cancer, including TNBC. Nearly 20 percent of all breast cancers are triple-negative, which means they do not have the three most common receptors that fuel most breast cancer growth. These types of tumors are also unresponsive to hormone therapy or targeted-drugs. Thomas R. Webb, Ph.D., who serves as the director of Medical Chemistry at SRI Biosciences, will lead the research team, together with George Sledge, M.D., who is professor and chief of the division of Oncology at Stanford University Medical Center: "Stanford and SRI both have unique strengths, and together we can create something wonderful for patients with cancer: new treatments that are more effective and less toxic," Sledge said in a press release. "As both a medicinal chemist and ca
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