Nipple-Sparing Mastectomies Are Safe for Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer, Study Reports

Nipple-Sparing Mastectomies Are Safe for Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer, Study Reports
A study led by Mayo Clinic researchers has found that nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSM) undertaken to prevent breast cancer are as effective as invasive surgeries for women carrying the BRAC genetic mutation, a known risk factor for developing breast cancer. The findings were presented at the American Society of Breast Cancer Surgeons Annual Meeting (ASBrS 2016) held April 13–17 in Dallas, Texas. "Nipple-sparing mastectomy is gaining wide acceptance because of its superior cosmetic results, but pockets of the medical community remain skeptical that it is the right choice for the BRCA population," the study's lead author, James Jakub, a breast surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said in a recent news release. "This is the largest study of its kind to address the controversy, and to show that nipple-sparing mastectomy is as effective at preventing breast cancer as traditional mastectomy." Women opting for preventive mastectomies have been increasingly favoring a nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM), as this type of surgery leaves the nipple, areola, and breast skin intact, allowing reconstruction of more natural-looking breasts compared to traditional mastectomies. Modern NSM involves complete resection of all gross visible breast tissue, including tissue directly under the nipple. Researchers examined the incidence of breast
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