Breast Cancer Management: 11 Tips to Address Appetite Loss

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BC appetite2

1. Experiment with Food

Patients who suffer from breast cancer often experience appetite loss, including starting to dislike foods that previously tasted good. One way to address this is to try new foods, foods which differ from what would normally be eaten. However, it is important to try these while feeling good to avoid developing more food dislikes.

2. Eat Before Treatments

One of the problems is that patients experience nausea or vomiting after treatments such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or radiation therapy. To address this, it’s recommended patients eat a light meal several hours before the treatment. This can prevent these symptoms and avoid food aversions.

3.  Eat Food Cooked by Others

Asking other people to cook, eating prepared foods from a store, or ordering take-out can help patients who cannot stand the smells of cooking. Patients are also less inclined to eat if they have to cook for themselves when they are feeling unwell or low on energy, having someone else prepare the meal for you or buying food in will hopefully counteract this.

4. Eat Cold Foods

Cold foods have less smells, which can be enjoyable for patients with breast cancer and prevent food aversions. Try to add foods like yogurt, cottage cheese or sandwiches to the daily routines.

Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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