Breast Cancer Management: 11 Tips to Address Appetite Loss

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5. Eat with Plastic Utensils

After treatments, breast cancer patients can often detect a taste of metal in their mouth, particularly while eating. To avoid this problem patients can use plastic utensils to eat instead of the normal ones.

6. Clean the Palate Before Eating

Rinsing the mouth with tea, ginger ale, salted water or baking soda dissolved in water can help clean the palate and clear the taste buds. When done before a meal, it can help breast cancer patients eat better and easier. Some patients also find helpful sucking ice chips in between bites of food, which numbs the taste buds and helps them to eat better.

7. Don’t Force Any Food

If eating food does not feel good, the best thing is not to force it. Instead of forcing and eating food that tastes bad, it might be helpful to seek substitutes that are better tolerated. Forcing food may lead to nausea, vomiting or food aversions.

8. Eat Less and More Frequently

Instead of trying to eat heavily during the main meals, patients may find it helpful to eat smaller amounts but more frequently. That way, breast cancer patients may find it easier to eat more without noticing or feeling too full.

Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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