Breast Cancer Patients with No Uterine Abnormalities Can Safely Use Nolvadex Therapy, Study Finds

Breast Cancer Patients with No Uterine Abnormalities Can Safely Use Nolvadex Therapy, Study Finds
A new study may help to reassure groups of breast cancer patients concerned that treatment with Nolvadex (tamoxifen) will increase their risk of endometrial, or uterine, cancer. The study, "Randomized trial of medroxyprogesterone acetate for the prevention of endometrial pathology from adjuvant tamoxifen for breast cancer: SWOG S9630," published in the Nature partner journal Breast Cancer, showed that if women found to be without uterine problems (like a thick inner lining, or endometrium) in a pre-screening are selected for Nolvadex treatment, the rate of tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities is much lower than expected. Nolvadex, a selective modulator of the estrogen receptor (ER), is one of the most frequently prescribed anticancer therapies worldwide. It is particularly effective when used in combination with surgery in women with early stage, ER-positive breast cancer, and is often used in post-menopausal women or other women at high-risk to prevent the development of breast cancer. "However, many women who would benefit from taking tamoxifen fail to do so because they fear getting endometrial cancer," Ronald K. Potkul, MD, chair of the department of obstetrics and oncology of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, and the study's first author, said in a press release. In fact, previous studies have reported a link between Nolvadex exposure and endometrial cancer risk. One particular study, a large Phase 3 trial called National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel P
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