Transparent Zebrafish Show Breast Cancer Cells Invading Bloodstream in Study Using Video

Transparent Zebrafish Show Breast Cancer Cells Invading Bloodstream in Study Using Video
A Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center research team has published a paper that details — in words and through video — the steps allowing scientists to track cancer cell invasion and metastasis in real time, using transparent zebrafish embryos. The approach was developed using breast cancer cells capable of entering the bloodstream. The paper, “Testing the Vascular Invasive Ability of Cancer Cells in Zebrafish (Danio Rerio),” and published online in the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE). The method may replace mice models in studies of cancer biology and for drug development, the researchers said, because of its speed and effectiveness at capturing cancer cell movement. Zebrafish, a tropical freshwater minnow, are commonly used in many research areas, but are only beginning to be of interest in cancer studies. "Invasion of the blood system is a significant step towards the metastatic spread of cancer cells, which is a significant threat to patients with cancer," Anton Wellstein, MD, PhD, co-senior investigator in the study and Georgetown professor and deputy director, said in a press release. "This method uses human cancer cells in zebrafish and can reveal distinct invasive properties of cancer cells, help identify genes that drive vascular invasion as well as to allow to test drugs that inhibit it.” Zebrafish are "increasingly used in oncology research, but the technique, which has a lot of moving parts, hadn't been written
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