Targeting Mutation May Offer Way of Treating Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Targeting Mutation May Offer Way of Treating Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
Researchers in Ireland may have found a promising treatment for patients with triple-negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of breast cancer. Their study, "Mutant p53: a novel target for the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer?," published in the International Journal of Cancer, shows that a drug which targets the p53 mutated protein can largely inhibit triple-negative breast cancer cell proliferation and migration, while also promoting programmed cell death. Currently, the most successful breast cancer treatments target one of three classes of hormone receptors found at the surface of cancer cells — estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and HER2 receptors. However, one in every six breast cancer patients do not express any of these receptors in their tumors,making their treatment difficult. "At the moment the only form of drug treatment available to patients with triple negative breast cancer is chemotherapy," Naoise Synnott, a PhD student at the Breast-Predict research group at University College Dublin, and the study's lead author, said in a press release. "While this will work well for some patients, others may find that their cancer cells don't respond as well as might be hoped to chemo, leading patients suffering the side effects of this treatment without any of the desired outcomes." Nearly 80 percent of triple-negative breast cancers carry muta
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