Veliparib Improved Response to Chemotherapy Without Boosting Survival

Veliparib Improved Response to Chemotherapy Without Boosting Survival
Adding the experimental PARP inhibitor veliparib to chemotherapy increased the number of patients who responded to treatment without worsening side effects, but failed to lengthen progression-free survival times, a breast cancer Phase 2 clinical trial (NCT01506609) has shown. The findings were reported at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium last week. Although the addition of veliparib failed to lengthen patients' lives, researchers hope to see longer survival times in the Phase 3 BROCADE 3 (NCT02163694) trial that is under way. They said the Phase 2 trial's enrollment of 290 patients may have been too small to show a difference in survival. More people are involved in Phase 3. PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) is a protein that repairs DNA damage in cells. The researchers hope that in blocking the DNA repair system, veliparib will increase the chance that cancer cells die during chemotherapy. The Phase 2 clinical trial  recruited metastatic breast cancer patients whose cancer had recurred after treatment. The women had mutations in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Such mutations increase the risk of cancer but also make cancer cells more sensitive to therapies that destroy their DNA. “Preclinical studies have shown that blocking a second DNA repair pathway in BRCA-mutant cancer cells using a PARP inhibitor makes the cells more susceptible to the effects of chemotherapeutics such as carboplatin," Heather S. Han, MD, an associate member of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, said in a
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.