Approved Therapy, Ibrance, Seen to Block Metastasis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Study

Approved Therapy, Ibrance, Seen to Block Metastasis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Study
Researchers may be one step closer to preventing triple-negative breast cancer, the most aggressive subtype of breast cancer, from spreading elsewhere in a person. Ibrance (palbociclib), an FDA-approved drug for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, could also effectively block metastasis in triple-negative breast cancers, they report. The drug, however, did not affect growth in the original tumor. The study, "CDK4/6-dependent activation of DUB3 regulates cancer metastasis through SNAIL1," was published in Nature Communications. "Metastasis is a hallmark of cancer and a leading cause of cancer death," Zhenkun Lou, PhD, of Mayo Clinic, the study's senior author, said in a press release. "Despite great progress in cancer therapy, the prevention of cancer metastasis is still an unfulfilled challenge." Lou and his team had a hint that inhibiting CDK4/6, which regulates a cancer metastasis protein, could influence the transition of immotile cancer cells into migratory cells — a process called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). They focused particularly on triple-negative breast cancer cells because such cancers are known to grow the fastest and to be more metastatic than any other breast cancer subtype. "Prior published data suggested that CDK 4/6 inhibitors were not effective in reducing the growth rates of estrogen receptor negative breast cancer," said Lou. "Our data confirmed that, while the rate of growth of triple-neg
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