30% of Aggressive Breast Cancer Patients Respond to Sacituzumab Govitecan, Trial Shows

30% of Aggressive Breast Cancer Patients Respond to Sacituzumab Govitecan, Trial Shows
Thirty percent of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) responded to the experimental therapy sacituzumab govitecan after failing to respond to other treatments, according to Phase 2 trial results. Other measures of its effectiveness included the length of time patients responded to treatment, overall patient survival rate, and time to progression. The therapy was also well-tolerated, the team added. The study, "Efficacy and Safety of Anti-Trop-2 Antibody Drug Conjugate Sacituzumab Govitecan (IMMU-132) in Heavily Pretreated Patients With Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer," was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Sacituzumab govitecan is an antibody-drug conjugate composed of an anti-TROP-2 antibody linked to a toxic payload, SN-38. TNBC patients, whose tumors lack estrogen and progesterone receptors and do not over-express HER2, lack targeted therapies. Chemotherapy is the current standard of care, but only 15 to 20 percent of patients with metastatic disease respond to it. "This approach may represent a new therapy paradigm for this difficult-to-treat disease, which is typically associated with an aggressive tumor biology and poor survival," Aditya Bardia, MD, MPH, of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center, said in a press release. He was the study's lead author. Sacituzumab govitecan has shown promise as a breast cancer therapy. It displayed high anti-tumor activity in preclinical models, and did not harm healthy cells. The therapy also got good marks in a Phase 1 clinical trial with previously treated metastatic TNBC patients. It achieved a 29 percent objective response rate -- that is, 29 percent of patients responded to it partially or completely. The median duration of response w
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