Cell Group Thought to Be Cause of Taxane Resistance in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Identified in Mice

Cell Group Thought to Be Cause of Taxane Resistance in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Identified in Mice
A  study in mice has shown that the mechanism behind taxane resistance in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) relies on the expansion of a specific cancer cell population, a CD49f+ population, with tumor-initiating properties. While further studies are needed to confirm this finding, the Spanish study suggests that analyzing the behavior of this cell population may help predict which TNBC patients will respond to chemotherapy. (Breast tumors that do not express hormone receptors are called triple negative tumors.) The study also shows that when treatment-resistant cancer cells were allowed to avoid the drug for long periods, their sensitivity to it is restored, suggesting that cancer patients might return to taxane-based therapies after relapsing. The findings were recently reported in the study, "Resistance to Taxanes in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Associates with the Dynamics of a CD49f+ Tumor-Initiating Population," published in Stem Cell Reports. Taxanes, like Taxotere (docetaxel), are a mainstay in the treatment of TNBC patients. But while these patients are usually more sensitive to taxane chemotherapy than other breast cancer patients, after multiple rounds of treatment, their tumors often acquire resistance to the drug. There remains an urgent unmet need to identify patients who will benefit from taxanes, and to understand the mechanisms underlying this resistance. Researchers at the B
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