Intratumoral Therapy Increases Response to Checkpoint Inhibitor in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Study Finds

Intratumoral Therapy Increases Response to Checkpoint Inhibitor in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Study Finds
Combining OncoSec Medical's intratumoral therapy, ImmunoPulse IL-12, with an immune checkpoint inhibitor is a promising approach for triple-negative breast cancer patients, a Phase 1 clinical trial  suggests. The approach induced robust objective responses in two patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer who had already had received multiple lines of therapy. Such patients typically do not respond to checkpoint inhibitors. "Metastatic TNBC is a heterogeneous cancer with a poor prognosis where less than five percent of pre-treated patients achieve an objective response to PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint treatments," Sharron Gargosky, chief clinical and regulatory officer of OncoSec, said in a press release. This happens because triple-negative breast cancers are typically devoid of tumor-infiltrating T-cells, which are needed for checkpoint inhibitors to work. These medicines activate T-cells, but do not recruit them into tumors. Therefore, approaches that recruit and expand T-cells within tumors are thought to enhance the response to immune checkpoint inhibitors. ImmunoPulse IL-12 consists in the intratumoral injection of a DNA strand coding for the interleukin-12 (IL-12) protein, followed immediately by electroporation. Electroporation is a technique that opens small pores in the cells' membranes, allowing the DNA molecule to enter. The approach leads to a localized
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