Gene Therapy Could Prevent Radiotherapy Side Effects, Improve Breast Reconstruction, Study Suggests

Gene Therapy Could Prevent Radiotherapy Side Effects, Improve Breast Reconstruction, Study Suggests
A new virus-based gene therapy could protect healthy tissue from the effects of radiotherapy and improve breast reconstruction surgery, a study with lab rats suggests. The therapy delivers copies of stress-limiting proteins into healthy tissues, preventing the side effects that sometimes appear months or years after cancer radiation treatment, which limit the effectiveness of breast reconstruction surgery. The therapy not only protected the transplanted tissue but also improved the destruction of tumor cells by radiotherapy, a team from The Institute of Cancer Research, London, showed. "Some women who need radiotherapy after a mastectomy have to wait up to six months after the end of their treatment before they can have breast reconstruction surgery, to allow time for side-effects to show themselves," the study's lead author, Kevin Harrington, professor of biological cancer therapies at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, said in a press release. "In the future, we hope this new viral gene therapy could protect healthy tissue transplanted during cancer surgery, bringing forward the subsequent operation to reconstruct the breast." The study, “Genetically modified lentiviruses that preserve microvascular function protect against late radiation damage in normal tissues,” appeared in the journal Science Translational Medicine. When a woman undergoes the surgical removal of her breast, a procedure called mastectomy, surgeons usually use a piece of tissue from another area of the body to partially reconstruct t
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.