Prognostic Breast Cancer Tests Show Variation When Predicting Risk of Recurrence in Most Common Breast Cancers

Prognostic Breast Cancer Tests Show Variation When Predicting Risk of Recurrence in Most Common Breast Cancers
Commercially-available prognostic breast cancer tests vary considerably in predicting disease recurrence in patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer, particularly during the time — five to 10 years — when half of patients recur, a new study shows. Combining clinical information, like tumor size and number of positive lymph nodes, with gene expression levels, enhanced the tests' predictive abilities, particularly in women with lymph node-positive disease. The study with these findings, “Comparison of the Performance of 6 Prognostic Signatures for Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer,” was published in JAMA Oncology. Women with ER-positive breast cancer usually are offered endocrine therapy after surgery. However, some may remain at high risk for recurrence in distant body locations. For these patients, additional chemotherapy may be beneficial. Since chemotherapy is linked with uncomfortable side effects, it is critical that women at high risk of recurrence be identified accurately. There are several commercially-available tests that analyze the cancer's gene expression, and combine this information with a patient's clinical information to identify patients for whom chemotherapy may be appropriate. While these tests are accurate in determining womens' risk of recurrence in the first five years after treatment, it is still unclear how they perform for longer periods. Researchers at Queen Mary University of London compared four prognostic tests in their ability to predict overal
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

One comment

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.