New Screening Guidelines Recognize High Breast Cancer Risk in African-American Women

New Screening Guidelines Recognize High Breast Cancer Risk in African-American Women
New breast cancer screening guidelines recognize for the first time that African-American women are at high risk for breast cancer and should be screened accordingly. The guidelines, published by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI), propose that all women, especially black women and those of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, be evaluated for breast cancer risk no later than age 30 so that those at higher risk can be identified and benefit from screening earlier than age 40. The guidelines also recommend that women previously diagnosed with breast cancer should now be screened with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As they did before, the two organizations continue to recommend that women of average risk begin screening at the age of 40 years old. "The latest scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports a continued general recommendation of starting annual screening at age 40. It also supports augmented and earlier screening for many women. These updates will help save more lives," Debra Monticciolo, MD, chair of the ACR Breast Imaging Commission, said in a press release. According to the most recent American Cancer Society’s "Cancer Facts & Figures for African Americans," breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed
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