Dacogen Shows Promise in Triple-negative Breast Cancer Animal Models, Study Shows

Dacogen Shows Promise in Triple-negative Breast Cancer Animal Models, Study Shows
Dacogen (decitabine), a medicine used for treating a group of blood cell disorders, may be a potential new treatment for women with triple-negative breast cancer, including those who failed chemotherapy, a study suggests. The study, “DNA methyltransferase expression in triple-negative breast cancer predicts sensitivity to decitabine,” was published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. "There is a great need to identify additional treatment options for triple-negative breast cancer, which is one of the most difficult to treat subtypes of breast cancer," Liewei Wang, MD, PhD, and senior author of the study, said in a press release. "The study is a demonstration that we can take advantage of many existing FDA approved drugs to expand their usage by better understanding the mechanisms of how they work and applying them to other cancers," she added. Dacogen is an inhibitor of proteins called DNA methyltransferases, which are enzymes that add chemical groups to DN
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