Genome Analysis of DNA from Nigerian Women Leads to 1st African Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model

Genome Analysis of DNA from Nigerian Women Leads to 1st African Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model
A genome analysis of the DNA of Nigerian women uncovered a higher burden of mutations in breast cancer-related genes, which may explain why sub-Saharan African women are more likely to develop aggressive breast cancer at a much younger age than women in the U.S. These results led to the development of the first African breast cancer risk prediction model to help reduce breast cancer mortality in these women. African and African-American women are more likely to develop triple-negative breast cancer and to die from it than women of other ancestries. To identify a potential inherited predisposition to breast cancer in this population, an international team of researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of Ibadan in Nigeria studied 1,136 Nigerian women with invasive breast cancer and 997 age- and heritage-matched women without cancer used as controls, from the same communities. Results were published in the study, “Inherited Breast Cancer in Nigerian Women,” in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. “This is the first study to use high-throughput genomic analysis of African women,” Olufunmilayo Olopade, MD, director of the Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics, associate dean of the Center for Global Health at the University of Chicago, and the study's lead author, said in a
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