A Primary Breast Cancer Tumor Can Inhibit Cancer Cells from Forming Secondary Tumors, Mice Study Shows

A Primary Breast Cancer Tumor Can Inhibit Cancer Cells from Forming Secondary Tumors, Mice Study Shows
Some types of breast cancers can prevent the development of secondary tumors elsewhere in the body, a process known as metastasis, through an immune-mediated inflammatory mechanism, an international research team showed. Understanding the complex communication network between the primary tumor and the disseminated metastasis-initiating cancer cells could open new therapeutic avenues to prevent cancer recurrence and improve survival rates. The findings were reported in the study “IL-1β inflammatory response driven by primary breast cancer prevents metastasis-initiating cell colonization,” published in the journal Nature Cell Biology. "This new research has yielded that rare thing - a clue from the cancer itself about new possibilities to fight its spread," Christine Chaffer, PhD, co-lead author of the study from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, said in a press release. "Our goal is to work out how we can mimic this 'freezing' of secondary cancers, so that one day we might influence all breast cancers to keep their secondary tumors in check," Chaffer added. It is known that once breast cancer has spread to other parts of the body, treatments are far less effective, and a patient's prognosis worsens. Using mice models of breast cancer, researchers observed that some had fewer metastases than others. After several experiments, they found that the primary tumor was actually controlling the effective dissemination of its own mal
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