Mammography Screening Does Not Reduce Breast Cancer Mortality, Study Suggests

Mammography Screening Does Not Reduce Breast Cancer Mortality, Study Suggests
While fewer women die from breast cancer now compared to a decade ago, the decline is no longer associated with mammography screening, but with improved treatment and healthcare, a Norwegian study suggests. The study, “Effect of organized mammography screening on breast cancer mortality: A population‐based cohort study in Norway,” was published in the International Journal of Cancer. Before the implementation of mammography screening programs, randomized clinical studies highlighted the importance of this type of screening, as it was shown to decrease breast cancer mortality by 19-20%. Currently, the value of mammography screening may not be the same, considering that substantial improvements have been made in terms of treatment and that people are now more aware of breast cancer and the importance of breast self-examination. However, different observational studies have reached inconsistent results in terms of the current benefit of breast cancer screening, with benefits ranging from zero to 43%. This discrepancy may be due to difficulties in separating the benefit associated with the introduction of mammography screening programs from that of these simultaneous changes that may influence breast cancer mortality. Researchers at Oslo University now have assessed the benefits of the mammography screening program in breast cancer mortality in Norway through a method that allows the differentiation of these two effects. They compared breast cancer mortality before and after the implementation of the screening progr
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