Tinagl1 Protein Suppresses Triple-negative Breast Cancer Development in Mouse Study

Tinagl1 Protein Suppresses Triple-negative Breast Cancer Development in Mouse Study
A naturally occurring protein, called Tinagl1, suppressed the growth and spread of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in mice by simultaneously targeting two cancer-promoting molecular pathways, a study shows. The study, "Tinagl1 Suppresses Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Progression and Metastasis by Simultaneously Inhibiting Integrin/FAK and EGFR Signaling," was published in the journal Cancer Cell. TNBC accounts for about one-fifth of breast cancer cases, and derives its name because tumors don't produce any of the three hormone receptors that are common in breast cancer: progesterone receptor, estrogen receptor, or HER2. In other breast cancer types, these receptors can be therapeutically targeted to treat patients. However, TNBC is less well-understood and is often driven by multiple interconnecting mutations and molecular pathways. Thus, there are fewer treatments available to patients with TNBC, leading to poor prognoses. Some strategies specifically targeting a specific molecular pathway have been tried in TNBC, but these frequently have had lackluster results; tumors often have redundancies in their molecular signaling networks that allow them to quickly become resistant to the inhibition of a single
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