Teaching an Old Drug New Tricks: Ketamine and Depression

Teaching an Old Drug New Tricks: Ketamine and Depression
“No fresh flowers,” my doctor said. “Avoid salad. No uncooked food. And don’t bring visitors home.” Treatment for breast cancer took the better part of a year, and a lot of that time, I spent alone. No wonder cancer sometimes comes with depression. I had chemotherapy for 16 weeks, and after each session, my white blood cell count dropped dangerously low. It’s a side effect called neutropenic fever, and it nearly took my life. Chemo saved me, but it almost killed me in the process. During those bouts of fever, my doctor told me to quarantine myself. I couldn’t risk exposure to germs that might weasel into my system. Being around my husband and our daughter was OK because our bodies have built up resistance to each other. Everyone else was off limits. The only upside was that my sisters cleaned my house. While I was getting infused with life-saving meds, Peg and Jane boiled every surface in our home. They scrubbed trashcans, bleached countertops, and scoured corners. Sometimes I wish I could fake neutropenic fever just to get my house that clean again. After chemo and surgery, I had a five-minute blast of X-rays every day for six weeks. My hospital was hours from home, and I thought my heart would break
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