More Intense Chemotherapy May Lower Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death, Study Says

More Intense Chemotherapy May Lower Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death, Study Says
Reducing the interval between chemotherapy treatment cycles or administering chemotherapy medications sequentially at higher doses, rather than simultaneously at lower doses, increases treatment efficacy and decreases the risk of breast cancer recurrence and death, a study suggests. The study, "Increasing the dose intensity of chemotherapy by more frequent administration or sequential scheduling: a patient-level meta-analysis of 37 298 women with early breast cancer in 26 randomised trials," was published in The Lancet. Previous studies have shown that conventional chemotherapy medications, such as anthracyclines (e.g., doxorubicin) and taxanes (e.g., paclitaxel and docetaxel), reduce breast cancer mortality by one-third in women at the earlier stages of disease. However, "the optimal dosage and timing of these two drugs is still unclear," according to the study. Additionally, previous modeling studies proposed that increasing chemotherapy dose intensity might enhance the elimination of cancer cells, reduce the odds of cancer recurrence, and maximize the chances of a cure. In theory, there are two different ways to boost che
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