Trilaciclib-Chemo Combo Extends Lives of Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients, Preliminary Phase 2 Findings Show

Trilaciclib-Chemo Combo Extends Lives of Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients, Preliminary Phase 2 Findings Show
Trilaciclib, a treatment that protects the bone marrow from the damaging effects of chemotherapy, significantly extends the lives of women with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer receiving a chemotherapy regimen of gemcitabine and carboplatin, G1 Therapeutics announced. Chemotherapy kills tumor cells that divide rapidly. However, a major side effect is that it also kills rapidly-dividing healthy cells, including important stem cells in the bone marrow. Those stem cells produce white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Therefore, most chemotherapy agents cause bone marrow toxicity as a secondary effect. That leads patients to reduce their chemotherapy dose, or stop the treatment, which increases the chances of cancer progression. Trilaciclib, developed by G1 Therapeutics, is a myelopreservation agent — meaning it protects the bone marrow from damage caused by chemotherapy. Combining chemotherapy and myelopreservation agents increases the amount of chemotherapy that individuals can tolerate, thus improving patient outcomes. The treatment's protective effects were demonstrated in lung cancer patients, but their need for supportive care and dose reductions is significantly lower. Now, trilaciclib is being evaluated in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer patients — a population whose chemotherapy treatment is often limited by bone marrow toxicity. An ongoing, randomized, Phase 2 clinical trial (
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