Trial Testing Eftilagimod Alpha-Chemo Combo for HR-positive Advanced Breast Cancers Now Fully Enrolled

Trial Testing Eftilagimod Alpha-Chemo Combo for HR-positive Advanced Breast Cancers Now Fully Enrolled
Immunotep has completed patient enrollment for its Phase 2b trial evaluating eftilagimod alpha (IMP321) — an investigational therapy that stimulates the immune system to fight cancer — in combination with standard chemotherapy for women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive and HER2-negative advanced breast cancer. Combining active immunotherapy with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens, like paclitaxel, is a promising new strategy for people with advanced breast cancers, scientists say. Chemotherapy induces the death of tumor cells that, when dying, release tumor antigens — proteins that can induce an immune response. These are captured by antigen-presenting cells, or APCs, that have the ability to “present” tumor proteins to other cells of the immune system, namely the cancer fighting T-cells. “By combining efti with chemotherapy, we hope to boost the body’s immune response against tumour cells and improve treatment outcomes compared to giving chemotherapy alone,” Hans Wildiers, the trial’s lead researcher, said in a press release. The majority of immunotherapies currently in clinical trials target checkpoint inhibitors, like the PD-1/PD-L1 proteins. These inhibitors play a major role in the suppression of the immune system, allowing tumors to evade immune detection. This strategy has shown good responses in certain breast cancers. However, it has demonstrated limited efficacy in women with advanced HR-positive breast cancer. “Most studies in metastatic breast cancer, including immune therapy, are focusing on blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint pathway, but results have been disappointing in this type of hormone sensitive metastatic breast cancer," Wildiers said. "With efti, we hope to activate the immune system more efficiently
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