Keytruda, Imprime PGG Combo Increases Overall Survival in Metastatic Triple-negative BC, Data Show

Keytruda, Imprime PGG Combo Increases Overall Survival in Metastatic Triple-negative BC, Data Show
Treatment with Biothera Pharmaceutical's Imprime PGG appears to increase the sensitivity of chemotherapy-resistant metastatic triple-negative breast cancers (mTNBC) to the immune checkpoint inhibitor Keytruda (pembrolizumab), interim data from a Phase 2 study show. The combination nearly tripled treatment responses and extended survival by about seven months in this patient population, which is unlikely to benefit from immune checkpoint inhibitors, The findings were presented at the 2019 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, in Texas, in a poster titled "Response and clinical benefit assessment of the combination of the dectin-1 agonist imprime PGG and anti-PD-1 pembrolizumab in chemotherapy-resistant metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC)." Immune checkpoint inhibitors like Keytruda (developed by Merck, known as MSD outside the U.S. and Canada) work by preventing interactions between cancer cells and immune cells that dampen immune responses. The approach boosts the body's own immune system, increasing survival outcomes in many tumor types. In triple-negative breast cancers, however, immune checkpoint inhibitors have only led to minimal benefit. Patients who failed to respond to their first-line chemotherapy regimen have low response rates (5-6%), and only about 37-40% live longer than one year. The reason behind this is that people with triple-negative breast cancers typically lack T-cells within their tumors, and these cells are needed for checkpoint inhibitors to work. Thus, approaches that recruit T-cells to tumors should increase clinical responses to these therapies. Imprime PGG is an investigational dectin receptor agonist that acts as an immunological “ignition switch.” It triggers a cascade of events throughout the innate immune
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