New Method Using Sound Waves May Stop Breast Cancer Spread in Lymph Nodes, Mouse Study Shows

New Method Using Sound Waves May Stop Breast Cancer Spread in Lymph Nodes, Mouse Study Shows
A new method that uses sound waves to release chemotherapy in lymph nodes invaded by breast cancer cells could offer a safer option to other, more invasive techniques, according to results from a mouse study. Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan created small vesicles, or hollow beads, filled with chemotherapeutic agents that burst upon contact with sound waves. The vesicles were injected into the mice's lymphatic systems, traveling to the affected lymph nodes. When high-intensity ultrasound was applied to the armpit, the vesicles ruptured, releasing the medicines in a targeted manner. The approach effectively killed breast cancer cells in the lymph nodes without damaging the lymphatic vessels and with minimal systemic toxicity, the researchers said. The study, “Use of a Lymphatic Drug Delivery System and Sonoporation to Target Malignant Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Proliferating in the Marginal Sinuses,” was published in the journal Nature. In the advanced stages of breast cancer, malignant cancer cells can enter the lymphatic vessels and establish metastasis in the lymph nodes. From there, the cells can travel through the lymphatic system and spread the cancer to distant regions of the body. Treating aff
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