breast cancer symptomsWomen (and men, because men can get breast cancer, too) should conduct a self-examination of their breasts if they see, feel, or suspect any kind of abnormalities or irregularities. These include:

  • Unusual tenderness of the nipple, with pores formed near the nipple (like those found in orange peels);
  • Thickening of the area near the breasts or underarms, or the presence of a lump near the nipples or anywhere in or around the breast tissue;
  • Unexplained shrinkage in the size of the breasts;
  • Asymmetrical appearance of the breasts which might seem unusual;
  • Nipples that appear slightly inverted in their orientation, compared to their normal appearance;
  • The skin near the nipples or surrounding them, or an area around the breasts, appears red and patchy or scaly;
  • Check for any kind of clear or bloody discharge from the nipples. Nipple discharge isn’t necessarily abnormal, even when a woman is not breastfeeding, but it should be checked by a physician. A man who notices nipple discharge should always have it evaluated, regardless of the circumstances.

Read about Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

Note: Breast Cancer News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
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