Breast Cancer Vaccine Shows Promising Results According to Study

Breast Cancer Vaccine Shows Promising Results According to Study
In a recent study titled “Safety and preliminary evidence of biological efficacy of a mammaglobin-A DNA vaccine in patients with stable metastatic breast cancer”, and published in the Clinical Cancer Research journal, a team of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, evaluated the safety and biological efficacy of a breast cancer vaccine in patients suffering with the metastatic form of the disease. The results indicated this vaccine was able to activate the patient’s immune system, allowing it to attack cancer cells and therefore slower tumor progression. Researchers found that a protein called Mammaglobin-A (MAM-A) is expressed at high levels in 40% to 80% of primary breast cancers. As such, the new vaccine (MAM-A DNA) directs the patient’s immune system to target this protein, which is almost exclusive to breast cancer cells. "Being able to target mammaglobin is exciting because it is expressed broadly in up to 80 percent of breast cancers, but not at meaningful levels in other tissues," senior author William E. Gillanders, MD, professor of surgery said in a news release. "In theory, this means we could treat a large number of breast cancer patients with potentially fewer side effects. It's also exciting to see this work progress from identifying the importance of mammaglobin-A, to designing a therapeutic agent, manufacturing it and giving it to patients, all by investigators at Washington University," he added. In this Phase I clinical trial, 14 patients with stable metastatic breast cancer expressing mammaglobin-A were enrolled in the study. Immune responses elicited by the vaccine (CD8 T cell levels) were measuredby ELISPOT, flow cytometry, and cytotoxicity assays. Some patients demonstrated some side effects,
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