20-Year Follow-Up to Clinical Trial Examines Risks of Recurrence

20-Year Follow-Up to Clinical Trial Examines Risks of Recurrence
The presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer, and young age are associated with increased risk of tumor recurrence on the same side of the body after treatment with breast-conserving therapy, according to a long-term follow-up of the EORTC "boost no boost" clinical trial. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study, "Prognostic Factors For Local Control in Breast Cancer After Long-term Follow-up in the EORTC Boost vs No Boost Trial," published in JAMA Oncology, also reveals that while the association of high-grade invasive tumors with recurrence decreased after five years, the effect of DCIS adjacent to invasive tumor-in-tumor recurrence remained stable over time, suggesting that those with DCIS require longer follow-up times. The randomized Phase 3 EORTC "boost no boost" clinical trial (NCT02295033) was designed to evaluate the effects of an extra dose of radiation therapy (boost dose) after breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. The study showed that adding the extra dose of whole-breast irradiation had no effect on long-term overall survival, but improved local control, compared to those who only received the breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Earlier analysis of the EORCT boost no boost trial revealed that young age and high-grade tumors were associated with a higher risk of local recurrence after treatment, but the recurrence rate could be reduced with the extra radiation therapy dose, particularly in young patients. In the follow-up study, a team of researchers led by Conny Vrieling, MD, PhD, of the Clinique des Grangettes, Switzerland, sought to reanalyze the prognostic factors related with breast cancer recurrence in
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