New Immunotherapy Rid Patient of Cancer in Breast, Everywhere Else, Study Reports

New Immunotherapy Rid Patient of Cancer in Breast, Everywhere Else, Study Reports
A new immunotherapy method that targets a patient's tumor cell mutations led to a complete and lasting regression of breast cancer in a woman who had failed all other treatments, a study reported. The woman, whose disease already had spread to other organs, was free from cancer more than 22 months after receiving the therapy. The study, “Immune recognition of somatic mutations leading to complete durable regression in metastatic breast cancer,” was published in the journal Nature Medicine. The new immunotherapy approach, developed by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surgery Branch, consists of a modified version of autologous adoptive cell transfer — the transfer of a patient's own cells after they have undergone some kind of treatment or modification. Adoptive transfer of anti-tumor lymphocytes — white blood cells capable of recognizing and killing cancer cells — has shown effectiveness in treating cancers with high levels of mutations, including melanoma, smoking-induced lung cancers, and bladder cancer. However, to date, this approach has been unsuccessful for treating other ty
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