Early-stage Breast Cancer Patients Failing to Use to Hormone Therapy Long-term, French Study Finds

Early-stage Breast Cancer Patients Failing to Use to Hormone Therapy Long-term, French Study Finds
A high percentage of younger, premenopausal women being treated for early-stage breast cancer do not continue to use tamoxifen, a hormonal therapy, within the first year of treatment, despite being advised to use it for at least five years, a French study reports. The study, “Serum assessment of non-adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (ET) among premenopausal patients in the prospective multicenter CANTO cohort,” was presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2018 Congress, in Munich last month. Most breast cancers are HR-positive, meaning they depend on hormones, like estrogen, to continue growing. These cancers are generally treated with hormone therapies, like tamoxifen, that prevent estrogen from interacting with its receptor, thus reducing growth signals to the tumors. The recommended period for hormonal therapy ranges between five and 10 years, but studies suggest that many patients — particularly younger, premenopausal ones — fail to adhere to long-term treatment. Inadequate treatment increases the risk of cancer relapse and metastatic disease. Researchers aimed to assess the proportion of premenopausal breast cancer patients who stopped long-term treatment with tamoxifen. Women in this study had taken part in the CANTO trial (NCT01993498), a large French evaluation of the l
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