Blocking Interaction Between Blood Vessels, Cancer Cells Could Prevent Disease’s Spread, Study Says

Blocking Interaction Between Blood Vessels, Cancer Cells Could Prevent Disease’s Spread, Study Says
Blocking the interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment could be a viable strategy to eliminate cancer cells that stray from the primary tumor, thereby preventing cancer's spread, according to a study. "Targeting the perivascular niche sensitizes disseminated tumour cells to chemotherapy," was published in Nature Cell Biology. While treatments with chemotherapy and hormone therapy after surgery significantly improve the lives of breast cancer patients, nearly 10% of these patients will relapse within five years. This is caused by cancer cells that manage to stray from the primary tumor before being detected and invade other tissues in the body, called disseminated tumor cells (DTCs). Once DTCs migrate and establish themselves in distant tissues, systemic conventional chemotherapy "with regimens that include dose-dense Adriamycin (also known as doxorubicin) plus cyclophosphamide (AC) and/or paclitaxel (also known as Taxol)" fails to eliminate them. Scientists long believed the reason DTCs resist chemotherapy is that most of them remain in a quiescent (non-proliferative) state. Now, a team of researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, and their collaborators challenged this idea, arguing that it is the microenvironment, and not cancer cells' state, that shields DTCs from chemotherapy. To prove
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.