Frying Oil Reheated Often, Like in Deep Frying, Seen to Promote Breast Cancer’s Spread in Animal Study

Frying Oil Reheated Often, Like in Deep Frying, Seen to Promote Breast Cancer’s Spread in Animal Study
Frying oil that has repeatedly been reheated to high temperatures — as can take place in deep frying of foods — may cause genetic changes that trigger the growth and spread of breast cancer, a study in a mouse model of the disease reports. The study, "Thermally Abused Frying Oil Potentiates Metastasis to Lung in a Murine Model of Late-Stage Breast Cancer," was published in Cancer Prevention Research. Fats are responsible for approximately 35% of the total calories ingested by an average person in the U.S. Cooking oil used in deep-fried food is a major cause for concern, as toxic chemical alterations can happen when the oil is heated at high temperatures (between 175-192ºC), and particularly when the oil is reused. For this reason, many countries worldwide have put in place regulations in an attempt to ensure cooking oil quality. In this study, a group of scientists at the University of Illinois evaluated the impact of chemical alterations caused by cooking oil reheating on cancer growth and its spread in a mouse model of late-stage breast cancer. To trigger the onset of late-stage cancer, investigators injected malignant breast cancer cells into one of the tibias (one of the bones of the lower leg) of healthy mice. These cells are so aggressive they can spread rapidly throughout the body and reach the lungs, liver and lymph nodes. To track these cells over time and to assess cancer's spr
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