Antibiotic in Long Use for Leprosy, Clofazimine, May Treat Triple-negative Breast Cancer, Mouse Study Suggests

Antibiotic in Long Use for Leprosy, Clofazimine, May Treat Triple-negative Breast Cancer, Mouse Study Suggests
Clofazimine, an antibiotic long used for treating leprosy and tuberculosis, may be repurposed as a promising potential treatment for triple-negative breast cancer, a study in mice suggests. The treatment targets the Wnt signaling pathway – key in triple-negative breast and other cancer types – preventing cells from growing, and can be safely combined with conventional chemotherapeutic agents that kill the cells, researchers found. The study, "Towards the first targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer: Repositioning of clofazimine as a chemotherapy-compatible selective Wnt pathway inhibitor," was published in the journal Cancer Letters. The best way to treat cancer is by using therapies that specifically target cellular elements that promote survival of cancer cells without affecting the healthy ones. "These elements - called oncogenes - are necessary to transform healthy cells into malignant cells, so it is important to bring them down without damaging neighboring cells," Vladimir Katanaev, PhD, professor at the University of Geneva and senior author of the study, said in a press release. Triple-negative breast cancer got its name because these tumors don’t produce any
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