Tumor Mutations May Help Predict Patients Best Suited to Pre-surgery Chemotherapy

Tumor Mutations May Help Predict Patients Best Suited to Pre-surgery Chemotherapy
Researchers identified mutations in breast cancer samples that may help predict which patients have the best chances of success from pre-surgical, or neoadjuvant, chemotherapy, and which may need an alternative course of treatment. The study, conducted by researchers at Yale University, also sheds light on how cancer cells survive chemotherapy. While mutations in BRCA-related DNA repair mechanisms appear to confer increased sensitivity to neoadjuvant chemo, alterations in cell growth-regulating genes could be involved in resistance to the therapy, the researchers found. The study, "Analysis of Pre- and Posttreatment Tissues from the SWOG S0800 Trial Reveals an Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on the Breast Cancer Genome," was published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. Researchers from the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute launched the S0800 trial (NCT00856492) 10 years ago. The study compared how well different pre-surgical chemotherapy regimens (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and
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