Tecentriq-Chemo Combo Ups Percentage of TNBC Patients With No Cancer at Surgery

Tecentriq-Chemo Combo Ups Percentage of TNBC Patients With No Cancer at Surgery
When given alongside chemotherapy, Tecentriq (atezolizumab) increases the percentage of people with early triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who show no signs of cancer during tumor removal surgery, a Phase 3 trial shows. These results were found regardless of the patient's PD-L1 status, or the amount of the PD-L1 protein on the individual's cancer cells. The study, called IMpassion031 (NCT03197935), is the second Phase 3 trial carried out by Genentech showing the benefits of Tecentriq for people with TNBC. It is the first to demonstrate that these benefits also can be attained in patients at the early stages of the disease. “Triple-negative breast cancer remains an aggressive disease with high rates of recurrence,” Levi Garraway, MD, PhD, chief medical officer and head of global product development at Genentech, said in a press release. “Our goal in treating TNBC at its earliest stages is to provide people with the best chance for a future cure," Garraway saidd. "Adding Tecentriq to chemotherapy now has the potential to help women with TNBC at multiple different stages of the disease.” Tecentriq, developed by Genentech, a Roche subsidiary, is an immune checkpoint inhibitor that has been approved to treat different types of cancer, including bladder and non-small cell lung cancer. The medication works by binding PD-L1, a substance produced by cancer cells, and preventing it from interacting with its receptor, called PD-1, which can be found on the surface of immune cells. Through this mechanism, Tecentriq blocks the signaling cascade that allows cancer cells to evade being targeted and killed by immune cells. Tecentriq has been approved in the U.S. and the E.U. as part of a combo treatment for people with advanced PD-L1-positive TNBC. It
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