Inflammation May Improve The Clinical Outcome of Specific Subtypes of Breast Cancer

Inflammation May Improve The Clinical Outcome of Specific Subtypes of Breast Cancer
89465_webResearchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, led by Dr. W. Lee Kraus, identified a cross-talk between inflammatory and estrogen effects on the growth of breast cancer. The study entitled “TNFa Signaling Exposes Latent Estrogen Receptor Binding Sites to Alter the Breast Cancer Cell Transcriptome” was published in the journal Molecular Cell. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States with 12.3 percent expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime, according to statistics from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). About 65% of breast cancers have a significant number of estrogen hormone receptors (regulators of gene transcription) and their growth is stimulated by this hormone (ER positive). These types of cancers can be targeted by anti-hormone therapies such as Tamoxifen that lowers their response to estrogen. The immune response is another important player in tumor growth as immune cells can produce a cytokine called tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa), a pro-inflammatory molecule. While estrogen stimulates proliferation of breast cancer cells, TNFa can have either proliferative or anti-proliferative effects depending on the tumor ty
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