Keytruda Helped Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer, Studies Find

Keytruda Helped Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer, Studies Find
Keytruda (pembrolizumab) was effective in treating triple-negative breast cancer regardless of whether women had received previous treatment, according to data presented at the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago. The studies, “Phase 2 study of pembrolizumab (pembro) monotherapy for previously treated metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC): KEYNOTE-086 cohort A,” and “Phase 2 study of pembrolizumab as first-line therapy for PD-L1–positive metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC): Preliminary data from KEYNOTE-086 cohort B,” were presented by researchers from the NYU Langone's Perlmutter Cancer Center. The trial (NCT02447003) included two groups of patients with advanced breast cancer that had spread to other locations. The first group was composed of 170 patients who had received extensive earlier treatment. Keytruda is a checkpoint-blocking drug, and patients in the first group were included regardless of whether the checkpoint molecule PD-L1 was present in the tumor. The second group had not received earlier treatment and had tumors expressing PD-L1. Among pre-treated patients, Keytruda shrank tumors by more than 30 percent in eight (5 percent) of the women, and stabilized disease in 35 women (21 percent) of the group. All eight patients who saw their tumors shrink lived for at least another
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