Clinical Trial Will Test Investigational Therapy Targeting ‘Dormant’ Breast Cancer Cells

Clinical Trial Will Test Investigational Therapy Targeting ‘Dormant’ Breast Cancer Cells
GlycoMimetics is planning a clinical trial testing its therapy candidate GMI-1359 as a treatment for breast cancer patients whose tumors have spread to the bones, the company announced. GMI-1359 is a small molecule that simultaneously targets E-selectin and CXCR4, two adhesion molecules —  cell surface proteins that mediate the interaction between cells — that help cancer cells migrate and spread through the body. “Our preclinical research in mice suggests that targeting E-selectin and CXCR4 with a single agent may potentially improve treatment of patients at risk of metastasis to bone, or whose tumors might have already spread,” Dorothy Sipkins, MD, PhD, one of the study’s lead investigators and a member of the Duke Cancer Institute, said in a press release. Breast cancer can return, or relapse, in patients years after completing treatment, suggesting the existence of breast cancer cells that remain dormant. Sipkins and her team showed in a 2016 study that these dormant cells hide in protective sites — mostly in the bone marrow, where they are protected from chemotherapy effects — aided by CXCR4 and E-selectin. Sipkins found that E-selectin allows breast cancer cells to enter the bone marrow, while CXCR4 anchors them to these prote
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.